Cider Celebrates The American Cheese Plate!

As the American Cheese Society gathers in Sacramento for the annual ACS conference, (with over 1600+ cheeses and 100’s of makers, mongers and curd nerds), our resident cheesemonger – who tweets @ConsiderTheRind & writes on all things cheese at ConsiderTheRind.com will be heading West to the Festival of Cheese.

Along the ways she’ll stop at The Healdsburg SHED, to team up with Tilted Shed Ciderworks, Devoto Orchards Cider, Gypsy Cheese Co., & Weirauch Farm & Creamery on August 3rd, for what promises to be an exciting East Meets West Cider & Cheese Tasting Workshop, details here.

Get your Brown Paper tickets here!

For more details follow @craftyandbeast #ciderchat (TONIGHT) Thursday, July 24th, 6PM PST/9PM EST – we’ll be #ciderchatting about the upcoming cider & cheese event, and encourage all you cider & cheese fans to ‘pair up’ and create some tasting events of your own.

Links:

healdsburgshed.com

www.tiltedshed.com

www.devotocider.com

www.gypsycheese.com

www.weirauchfarm.com

craftyandthebeast.com

@craftyandbeast #ciderchat

American Cheese Society

CtR (1)

 

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Cider. A Review in Pictures.

 

Cider. A Review in Pictures.

Imagining cider as a work of art.

No written commentary needed.

 

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Celebrating 200 Years of the Historic Fort Ross Orchard

Fort Ross1383074_232226773603226_180268532_n

Photograph by Paul C. Miller, courtesy of Fort Ross Conservancy

Where & When:

Fort Ross State Historic Park
19005 Coast Hwy
JennerCA 95450

Saturday, April 12, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 3:30 PM (PDT)

Event Details:

In 1814, the Russians at Fort Ross began their orchard by planting a peach tree. They and the ranchers who followed planted trees and harvested fruit from the site for over 150 years, and a number of historic trees still survive today.

In celebration of the historic Fort Ross orchard’s 200th anniversary, Fort Ross Conservancy is hosting a conference on orchards and orchard management. Lectures by experts from the National Park Service and California State Parks will discuss the history of orchards, historic orchard care, and tree preservation. A tour of the Fort Ross orchard will follow, with an opportunity to discuss recent management at the site.

The Fort Ross orchard was planted by the Russians in 1814 and several trees from the mid 1800s are still living, including two Russian-era cherry trees. This conference celebrates the 200th anniversary of the historic orchards at Fort Ross. Conference speakers include:

  • Susan Dolan, Park Cultural Landscapes Program Manager with National Park Service, will provide an overview of the history of orchards, and discuss basic techniques in orchard stabilization,
  • Jan Wooley, Historic Preservationist with California State Parks, will discuss orchards and ongoing work within the California State Parks System,
  • Susan Rudy, Fort Ross Conservancy Advisor and lead orchard volunteer, will describe the history and ongoing care of the Fort Ross orchard,
  • Amigo Bob Cantisano (tentative) will discus the Felix Gillet Historic Orchard Project. This organization identifies, preserves, and propagates the best varieties of fruit and nut trees still thriving in the mining camps, farms, homesteads and towns of the Sierra that were introduced by Felix Gillet, of Nevada City, Calfiornia, in 1871.

Schedule for the Day

  • 10am – 1pm    Lecture/Presentations in the Fort Ross Visitor Center auditorium
  • 1:30-2:30        Lunch at the orchard
  • 2:30-3:30        Historic Fort Ross Orchard tour
  • 4pm                Optional tour of the Fort Ross Historic Compound.

Special event fees apply:

$10 per person for conference and historic orchard tour.
*plus* California State Parks entrance fee of $8 per car when parking at Fort Ross. (Please carpool!)

Optional boxed lunch delivered to the orchard: $15/ person, advanced purchase only.
Or you are welcome to bring your own picnic lunch!

visit-s

For more information on the Fort Ross historic orchard visit the Orchard webpage.

Link: www.fortross.org

Tickets & event details available at:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/celebrating-200-years-of-the-historic-fort-ross-orchard-tickets-10786062403

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Photograph by Paul C. Miller, courtesy of Fort Ross Conservancy

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Photograph by Paul C. Miller, courtesy of Fort Ross Conservancy

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Photograph by Paul C. Miller, courtesy of Fort Ross Conservancy

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Photograph by Paul C. Miller, courtesy of Fort Ross Conservancy

All photos by Paul C. Miller, courtesy of Fort Ross Conservancy

Map courtesy of Fort Ross Conservancy

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Why do we need so many kinds of apples?

Apples in a crate at Albemarle Cider Works Vintage Virginia Apples

“Why do we need so many kinds of apples?

Because there are so many folks. A person has a right to gratify his legitimate tastes. If he wants twenty or forty kinds of apples for his personal use, running from Early Harvest to Roxbury Russet, he should be accorded the privilege. Some place should be provided where he may obtain trees or scions. There is merit in variety itself. It provides more points of contact with life, and leads away from uniformity and monotony.”
–Liberty Hyde Bailey, The Apple Tree, p. 68
(New York: Macmillan, 1922)

Celebrating America’s Unique Apple Diversity: Selected Literature

Special Reference Briefs Series

No. SRB 2010-02

Compiled by:
Rebecca Mazur and Katie Winkleblack
National Agricultural Library
Agricultural Research Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
10301 Baltimore Avenue
Beltsville, MD 20705
agref@nal.usda.gov
http://www.nal.usda.gov

September 2010
Updated September 2011

“This bibliography is a selected compilation from the rich pool of information resources at the National Agricultural Library about heirloom apples. It consists of a list of books and reports at the Library dating prior to 1928, with the addition of later books which focus on the subject of varieties of apples grown in the American past. It is organized into sections first by date and then in order of the author’s last name.”

Link: http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/pubs/srb1002.shtml#1754

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Deadline Bean Town. 3 Cider Taste-Off Results. A Report from Outpost Boston.

BostonTasteOff

From Our Boston Outpost:

Some time ago our intrepid Bean Town Cider Correspondent led a cider tasting somewhere in wilds of greater Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Tasters were a diverse batch –  ranging in age from just-legal whippersnappers, to seasoned imbibers. Of the assembled tasters a select few were cider-philes, most had only a glancing familiarity with our favorite pome fruit beverage, and some were completely cider-unaware, having no idea what to expect from a fermented apple elixir.

Ciders were selected based on local availability.

The Cider Contenders:

Bantam WUNDERKIND of Massachusetts

Fatty Bampkins DRY hailing from Maine

Vermont Cider Co. FARMHOUSE No. 91 

The 3 ciders were presented, glasses filled and the tasters let loose.

Our correspondent placed paper and pen by each cider bottle, and the testers jotted anonymous notes as they tasted.

Real people drinking actual ciders. Here is what they had to say:

Bantam WUNDERKIND Tasting Comments:

“The champagne of ciders!”

“Light, a wee sharp upfront, (illegible), like sparkling wine.”

“Likey!”

“Very sweet”

“Good body, nice aftertaste. A little too sweet.”

“Good with Food/Meal.”

“Sweet & tasty, makes me want a donut.”

“NICE!”

“More like apple juice.  Sweet & crisp but blends well.”

“Good sparkle & flavor. Has mellow apple flavor.”

Fatty Bampkins DRY Tasting Comments:

“faint apple taste”

“Light/Fresh, Refreshing – Not Much Flavor”

“Very Adult. – DRY.”

“Too TARTE”

“slight pickle scent??”

“No me gusta tambien. Very vinegary, not much apple flavor”

Vermont Cider Co. FARMHOUSE No. 91 Tasting Comments:

“sweet apple taste (heart).”

“Like soda-pop. Tastes like apples. (On purpose?)”

“delicious. very sweet. would prefer it to be a little more bubbly!”

“Flat but could be tasty otherwise.”

“Perfect for tweens.”

“Lacks effervescence, a bit sweet, but could be good in a cocktail!”

“Not enough effervescence for me, but the flavor is smooth.”

“Did I just drink alcohol? Pretty sure it was juice.”

The Consensus: Local craft cider Bantam WUNDERKIN is hands down favorite at this informal Boston cider tasting.

The Take Away:

1. We believe there is a cider for everyone.

2. How to find YOUR ciders?  Taste Testing. Extensive Taste Testing.

3. Cider Tasting is More Fun in Groups. Cider knowledge shared while tasting is enjoyable, and informal, casual tastings brings out the best in most ciders, and certainly results in some interesting comments.

4. If you like cider and want to share the cider joy, an informal tasting like this is a good way to introduce your cider-curious friends to the wonderful world of cider.

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Sneak Peek: September 2014: Apples of Uncommon Character by Rowan Jacobsen

9781620402276

Rowan Jacobsen

Apples of Uncommon Character

123 Heirlooms, Modern Classics, & Little-Known Wonders

(Plus 20 Sweet and Savory Recipes)

Bloomsbury, September 2014

Rowan Jacobsen: www.rowanjacobsen.com and @rowanjacobsen

Bloomsbury: www.bloomsbury.com

Photographer Clare Barboza (clarebarboza.com) shares a “visual sneak peek” from Uncommon Apples in her blog post a whole lotta apples.

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Cider Review: Eve’s Cidery BECKHORN HOLLOW DRY CIDER: Cider52

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Cider: BECKHORN HOLLOW DRY CIDER

Maker: Eve’s Cidery   Origin:  Van Etten, New York

website: www.evescidery.com

ABV: 8%   Bottle: 750 ml

Makers Style/Bottle Notes: “Naturally sparkling cider, fermented in this bottle”.

Fruit: Apple  Cider Maker:  Autumn Stoscheck

Eve's Cidery Beckhorn Hollow Dry

Our Tasting Notes: First glass, drinking at about 52 degrees.

In The Glass:  Clear pale white gold with a small, steady bead that settles to no visible bubble. 

Aroma: Apple peel, marzipan, honey, raw apple, baked apple, grassy, powdered sugar, citrus peel and spice.

Taste: Tart, sweet, slightly spirituous and warming, with stone fruit, dried apricot, and anise & fennel.

Overall Impressions: Refreshing with pleasing tart acidity, balanced by sweet, sour, and subtle bitter notes. Intend to taste this cider again if we can find – it’s a special blend – we discovered ours at Eve’s Cidery’s New York GrowNYC Greenmarket stall at Union Square. This cider is currently not listed on Eve’s Cidery’s website.

BONUS MIXOLOGY TIP: Eve’s Cidery Beckhorn Hollow Dry Cider with a splash of Eden Ice Cider Orleans Bitter is delicious and tremendously refreshing. Makes an easy apéritif or the start of an interesting cocktail.

Orleans Bitter

Watch an informative video about Eve’s Cidery’s orcharding practices: Orcharding with Autumn from Eve’s Cidery on Vimeo.

Eve’s Ciderywww.evescidery.com

Find Eve’s Cidery’s stall at the GrowNYC Union Square Greenmarket www.grownyc.org:  Friday MapSaturday Map.

Eden Ice Ciders: www.edenicecider.com

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33 Mugs Of Cider: Handy Tasting Review Pocket Journals from 33 Books Co.

Our Barstool Review – Cider Tasting On The Go Tool Kit (just add pencil).

Small, graphically pleasing, and easy to use pocket tasting notebooks from 33books.com.

We’re road-testing these handy little pocket tasting review journals: 33 Mugs of Cider & 33 Pieces of Cheese. The 33 Books Co. line currently also includes pocket guides for: Wine, Whiskey, Beer, Hot Sauce, Chocolate, Coffee & Cigars, with several others in the works.

They are indeed “powerful, yet pocket-sized”, eco-friendly, and include a dash of real cider in the printing ink!

Cider-drinkers, tasting rooms, bottle shops & taprooms – do consider this line of tasting journal books from 33books.com.

33_MUGS_CIDER_COVER CIDER_SPREAD

Links:

www.33books.com

Or jump right to the 33 Mugs of Cider

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What We’re Reading: Pomona’s Harvest by H. Frederic Janson

Pomonas Harvest

Pomona’s Harvest: An Illustrated Chronicle of Antiquarian Fruit Literature by H. Frederic Janson, Timber Press, 1996.

From Timber Press:

“An intriguing history of books about fruit from antiquity to the Industrial Revolution, including many beautiful engravings from key works. The relationship of pomology to social history and the history of ideas is explored, and there is a bibliography describing more than 600 fruit-related sources.”

This is an extremely valuable resource for anyone interested in early pomological texts, and pomological illustration.

Currently available as a print-on-demand paperback from these online retailers: Amazon.comBarnes & NoblePowell’s.

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Oh, Ithaca! A Very Moist City. 1921.

cropped-observations.jpg

The Cornell Daily Sun

Volume XLII, Number 4, 24 September 1921

MANUFACTURERS OF CIDER TOLD TO GET PERMITS

Federal Inspector Lays Down Law to Makers of the Beverage.

ITHACA VERY MOIST CITY

Official Claims More Liquor Here Than in Other Towns of Same Size.

REGULATIONS ON VINEGAR

Cannot Be Manufactured Without Having Bonds and Taking Legal Steps.

“There Is more liquor in Ithaca than in any other city of its size in New York State, according to a statement made by the federal director,” declared Jay Carpenter when he returned yesterday afternoon from a short trip to Syracuse. Mr. Carpenter, who was accompanied by E. J. Holmes, said that they had received instructions from the “district prohibition agent that neither they nor any other cider manufacturers in Tompkins county would be permitted to make any more cider unless they first obtained a federal permit and then gave a guarantee that the cider would never become sour. The official also informed his visitors that the federal agents have Ithaca in mind for another visit in the near future. It Is understood the interest of the federal enforcement bureau was drawn to Ithaca due to the large sales of hard cider which have been made in this city. Mr. Holmes and Mr. Carpenter, both of whom manufacture clder on an extensive scale, were cited to appear before the federal director in ‘Syracuse on Thursday. They were ‘ Turned that they had no right to manufacture cider without a permit and that if they obtain a permit they must absolutely guarantee that the cider would not turn sour. Mr. Carpenter maintained that, although his cider is pasteurized before it is sold, he cannot guarantee it will not become sour. The federal director informed the Itathacans that they could obtain permission to manufacture vinegar by filing a $2,000 bond and taking other necessary legal steps.

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Windfalls: Found Apple Poems, A Selection.

4a21388vLOC 
 
- – -
 
Api Panache
 
 
(Panachee).
 
Yellowish green,
 
 
round-ish, small,
 
indifferent;
 
 
October to December ;
 
 
more curious than useful.
 
- – -
 
Bedfordshire Foundling
 
 
(Cambridge Pippin). -
 
Yellow, roundish, oblong, large, kitchen,
 
 
first-rate ;  
 
 
November to March ;
 
 
very handsome, large and ex-cellent.
 
 
Bennet.
 
 
Greenish red, ovate,
 
 
middle-sized,
 
 
cider ;
 
 
November to December ;
 
 
a bitter-sweet. 
 
 
 
 
 

The Gardener”s Monthly Volume.

The Apple

It’s Culture, Uses, and History

1847

by George William Johnson & R. Errington

via googlebooks

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Wassail Traditions: The 5 Key Elements.

The Wassailing

Wassail In 5 Easy Steps.

The 5 Key Elements of Orchard Wassail As Outlined by NACM:

“The rite involves five main elements: gathering around an apple tree, singing the Wassailing song, pouring cider over the tree’s roots, loud noises and a toast.”

Rackham-Winter Trees

1 – Gather Around The Apple Tree.

2 – Sing Wassail Song(s) (There are several traditional songs & many variations).

3 – Pour Cider Over The Tree’s Roots (and place cider-toast in branches).

4 – Make Loud Noises (suggested implements: pots, pans, rattles, musicians, fireworks).

5 – TOAST! Salute the orchard, the apple, and the past & future harvest. (With cider, a Wassail bowl, or punch of your own devising).

Whether in the orchard, city, town, or on the farm, we encourage you to take these elements and discover/explore and create a Wassail event of your own.

Mark your calendars now, and start making plans for Wassail 2015.

NACM Wassail information  at cideruk.com

Rackham Lady's Apple

- Not near an orchard? Seek out local parks, or friendly neighbors with pome fruit trees, sites of trees & orchards of yesteryear, or devise a suitable stand-in, an elegant bowl of apples – or a spray crabapple branches, etc.

- As North American Wassailers we will continue to explore local & regional wassail culture and hope to uncover indigenous tunes & rituals, and share our discoveries for 2015.

Note: Repurposing New Year’s Eve noise-makers is a handy & thrifty way to get your Wassail noise-making kit started.

Images from A Dish of Apples by Eden Phillpotts, illustrated by Arthur Rackham, 1921. View or download at Internet Archive archive.org.

Come All Ye Cider Drinkers And Join In The Wassail!

Hudson River View from Fort Tryron

When is Wassail? We suggest observing North American Wassail celebrations from January 5th to  January 17th, 2014.*

Wassail is an informal collaborative effort of interested cider-drinkers in North America (and beyond).

Goals for the 2014 Wassail: Explore Old & New World Wassail Traditions, Salute The Orchard, Honor The Apple and Celebrate With Cider!

How Can You Wassail? It’s Easy! Enjoy cider and a wassail bowl with friends, visit an orchard, cidermaker or local cider-serving establishment and toast the orchard & the apple, or host a Wassail event of your own.

Let us know if you’re planning an event – we’ll post it on the Wassail 2014 page.

Share your Wassailing plans and pictures. Post, tweet, tumble and instagram The Wassail!

* We’re considering Wassailing all the way through January. Why not?!

 

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Wassail Day 1. We Salute Ye Olde Quince Trees.

Wassail Day 1. We Salute Ye Olde Quince Trees.

January 5th, 2014

The Plan: A visit to The Cloisters Museum to Wassail the 4 quince trees that live in the Bonnefont Cloister.

Capital detail Cruxa Cloister

The Wassail Implements: An empty soda can re-filled with dried beans – a bit of tape over the top to secure said beans, and a small travel-size plastic cosmetics bottle filled with 2 oz. of Etienne Dupont Cidre Bouché Brut de Normandy. Old World, New World Wassail To Go DIY Pocket Kit.*

The Cloisters Museum botanical collection includes pollarded crab apple trees, espaliered pears, exotic potted citrus fruits, and the famed quinces. Snowy conditions made it impossible to access the courtyards where the crab apples and quince reside, we could only view them through the frost-steamed windows of the Cruxa & Bonnefont Cloisters. We wished them a quiet Good Health and Good Fortune and vowed to return when the gardens were accessible in Spring.

Myrtle-leaved Sour Orange

A gallery talk, led by a knowledgeable and genial guide, focused on details of medieval life in the winter months, examining the seasonal feasting rituals and agricultural tasks that occupied the waking hours of medieval folk, including the varied wassailing traditions observed in the manor hall, monastery and village.

Pollarded crab apple trees Cruxa Cloister

Pollarded crab apple trees in Cruxa Cloister

Read about the fascinating “medieval technique of hard pruning, known as pollarding” in this article, Woodsman, Pollard That Tree.

*repurposed New Years noisemakers are a perfect addition to the DIY-Wassail To Go Kit.

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Wassail Day 1. Fortifying with Pear Brandy. Olmsted’s Sidecar Cocktail.

Wassail Day 1. Fortifying with Pear Brandy. Olmsted’s Sidecar Cocktail.

January 5, 2014.

The Plan: Locate and Wassail the four famous and beloved quince trees inside The Cloisters Museum at Fort Tryon Park.

Hudson River View from Fort Tryron

As the site of the quince cloister garden IS in a museum – we reasoned our Wassail activities would need to be discrete, if not completely covert. The park was covered with snow, the air was frosty, and we decided a pre-Wassail ‘warming’ beverage to fortify ourselves was in order.

The New Leaf Restaurant & Bar, located in a 1930’s era rustic deco-medieval structure originally built as a concession stand for Fort Tryon Park, proved the perfect spot to enjoy a surprisingly tasty brunch and a Wassail-appropriate cocktail to launch the festivities.

Sidecar

The Cocktail: Olmstead’s Sidecar

Ingredients: Koval Organic Ginger Liqueur, pear cognac, and lemon.

Olmsted’s Sidecar is made with Koval organic ginger liqueur (produced by a craft distillery in Chicago and hand bottled), pear cognac and lemon. Named for Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., the landscape architect who planned Fort Tryon Park, which was completed in 1935. He is the son of the designer of Central Park.”

New Leaf Restaurant & Bar newleafrestaurant.com

“New Leaf is an enterprise of the non-profit New York Restoration Project (NYRP). All net proceeds support NYRP’s mission of creating a greener, more sustainable NYC. Learn more at www.nyrp.org.”

KOVAL Distillery www.koval-distillery.com

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The Pagan Rite WASSAIL! Brown, Bradshaw and World’s Best Ciders.

In their extremely useful guide World’s Best Ciders: Taste, Tradition and Terroir, Pete Brown and Bill Bradshaw devote a few pages to explore Wassail traditions and celebrations. (The UK cover -pictured- even features the image of a torch-lit wassail).

WBC UK cover

According to Brown & Bradshaw:

“Like all the best traditions, the ritual of wassail is rooted in the past but allows every community to imposes it’s own stamp. It’s growing in popularity because it is an unmediated, unbranded entertainment that links us back to the land and the passing of the seasons.”

Celebrate Wassail: Grab a copy of World’s Best Ciders, pour a glass of cider or mug of wassail, and explore Wassail traditions past and present.

For more of Bill Bradshaw’s Wassail imagery visit IAMCIDER: iamcider.blogspot.com

Sterling Publishing www.sterlingpublishing.com

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These Days of Wassailing

POM00001121

Hello Friends of Cider!  Join us in embracing Wassail in 2014.

We’re observing North American celebrations from January 5th to January 17th, 2014*, from ‘New’ 12th Night Eve to ‘Old’ 12th Night.

Our Goals for The 2014 Wassail: Explore Old & New World Wassail Traditions, Salute The Orchard, Honor The Apple, and Celebrate With Cider.

How are WE Wassailing? To being the festivities, January 5th, 2014, we visited “the four beloved quinces at the Cloisters Museum and Gardens, along the Hudson River in Fort Tryon Park.” The Wassail did not go as planned, but Pomona surprised us with an amazing Wassail Wonder.

Read more about the New York Quinces in this piece In Praise of the Misunderstood Quince by By Michael Tortorello, published May 2, 2012 in the New York Times.

*Note: Our Wassailing activities are likely to continue throughout the month of January 2014, yours can too!

Image: Specimen 8168   Artist: Prestele, William Henry, 1838-1895

Scientific name: Cydonia oblonga  Common name: quinces  Variety: Bourgeat

Source: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705″

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Wassailius Mirabilis

Glowing Pome d'ApiA solitary Lady Apple or Pomme d’Api outside the walls of the Bonnefort Cloister garden at The Cloisters in New York City,  January 5th, 2014.

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It Begins. 13 Days of Wassailing 2014.

Ansel Adams Yosemite

Join Us In Wassailing.

We’re observing North American celebrations from January 5th to January 17th, 2014 – ‘New’ 12th Night Eve to ‘Old’ 12th Night – and posting daily about our Wassail adventures. Stay tuned.

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Cider Mixology: Aperitivo Tertulia.

Cider Mixology: Aperitivo Tertulia

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A Bit About Wassailing.

The Wassail (Charles Rennie Mackintosh)About Wassailing From the National Association of Cider Makers:

“Wassailing is the chief custom associated with cider apple trees. The word wassail is derived from the Anglo Saxon ‘wes hal’ meaning ‘good health’ or ‘be whole’. The earliest written records of wassailing date from the late 17th century.

This custom is performed to protect the trees from evil spirits and to make them bear a plentiful crop and is still carried out in the West of England. The rite involves five main elements: gathering around an apple tree, singing the Wassailing song, pouring cider over the tree’s roots, loud noises and a toast.

The pouring of cider over the roots symbolised the carrying forward of the life juice of the tree from one year to the next. It was also the custom to place a cider-soaked piece of toasted bread in the fork of the tree to attract good spirits while guns were fired into the trees so as to frighten away the evil spirits. The health of the tree would then be drunk as often as was felt necessary. Nowadays, it is traditional to hold the rite on Twelfth Night.

Over time, the custom was adapted and added to, so that each area had its own variation. The date for instance varied, and old tea kettles and tin trays might be clattered together to scare away the spirits instead of firing guns. In Herefordshire it was traditional for Morris Men to take part by dancing around the trees.”

Source: National Association of Cider Makers.

Link: www.cideruk.com

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A Call To Wassail. January 5th -17th, 2014.

The Wassail (Charles Rennie Mackintosh)

A Call To Wassail. January 5th – 17th, 2014.

Hello Friends of Cider!

We ask YOU the cider community to join us in embracing Wassail in 2014.

What is Wassail?

Wikipedia:

“The Orchard-Visiting wassail refers to the ancient custom of visiting orchards in cider-producing regions of England, reciting incantations and singing to the trees to promote a good harvest for the coming year.”

Herefordshire Times:

“Steeped in history, wassailing is traditionally held on the Twelfth Night after Christmas and performed in orchards to awaken the apple trees from their winter slumber and ward off bad spirits.”

When is Wassail?

We propose to observe North American celebrations from January 5th to  January 17th, 2014. (‘New’ 12th Night Eve to ‘Old’ 12th Night – more about that later).

Goals for the 2014 Wassail:

Explore Old & New World Wassail Traditions

Salute The Orchard

Honor The Apple

Celebrate With Cider

How Can You Wassail?

Enjoy cider and a wassail bowl with friends.

Visit an orchard, cidermaker or local cider-serving establishment and toast the orchard & the apple.

Host a Wassail Event.

Let us know if you plan an event – we’ll post it on our Wassail 2014 page.

The 2014 Wassail Theme: Discover Wassail.

We hope this will be an informal collaborative effort and an annual event for the growing cider community in North America.

The Wassail (Charles Rennie Mackintosh)

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Views from New Amsterdam Winter Market 2013

Images of floral beauty taken at the stall of, and garland making demonstration lead by, Emily Thompson of Emily Thompson Flowers www.emilythompsonflowers.com

Thank You to Rowan Imports for cider, and to Sterling Publishing, Countryman Press, Storey Publishing, Timber Press, Ten Speed Press, Chelsea Green Publishing, Johns Hopkins University Press, and Running Press for all the wonderful books included in our raffle gift baskets for the November & December Markets. Thank You All for helping us support New Amsterdam Market and share the cider joy.

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Events: NYC: New Amsterdam Winter Market and 8th Anniversary Celebration

New Amsterdam Market Winter Market & 8th Anniversary is December 15, 2013.

“Featuring over 60 regional food artisans, purveyors, market fare and handcrafted goods. From holiday wreaths, garlands, tools and ornaments for home decor to holiday treats, latkes, sweets, baked goods and gifts.”

To celebrate New Amsterdam Market’s 8th Anniversary we coordinated 3 amazing gift baskets (for yourself or for gift giving) containing some of our favorite books AND some terrific ciders. Support the Market with a raffle ticket or two, and you could be the lucky winner of one of these swell books & cider baskets.

Each basket comes with a selection of ciders of the world donated by Rowan Imports.

Cider Enthusiasts Selection:

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Books: Worlds Best Ciders by Pete Brown and Bill Bradshaw, Sterling Publishing, 2013

Cider Hard & Sweet by Ben Watson, Countryman Press, 3rd Edition, 2013 and

Cider: Making, Using & Enjoying Sweet & Hard Cider, 3rd Edition by Lew Nichols, Annie Proulx, Storey Publishing, 3rd Edition

Apple & Cider Aficionados Selection:

Books: Worlds Best Ciders by Pete Brown and Bill Bradshaw, Sterling, 2013 and

Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press, 2013.

NYC Food Culture Selection:

Books: I Love New York: Ingredients and Recipes by Daniel Humm, Will Guidara, Ten Speed Press, 2013 and

New York a la Cart: Recipes and Stories from the Big Apple’s Best Food Trucks by Siobhan Wallace and Alexandra Penfold, Running Press; 2013.

Celebrate 8 years of New Amsterdam Market, and support the revival of the historic Old Fulton Fish Market.

Links:

New Amsterdam Market newamsterdammarket.org

Rowan Imports rowanimports.com

 

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Mixology: The Buffalo Gold Cocktail. Brookville Restaurant, Charlottesville, Virginia.

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Virginia Pippin Gold Cider (with Virginia apple brandy) Meet Kentucky’s Buffalo Trace Bourbon.

Virginia knows how to make a cider cocktail. One of our favorites, (enjoyed with Brookville’s deliciously addicting bacon fat popcorn):

The Cocktail: The Buffalo Gold.

The Venue: Brookville Restaurant, Charlottesville, Virginia.
The Cider: Foggy Ridge Cider Pippin Gold.
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The recipe is as follows:
Iced highball glass
1 1/2 oz. Buffalo Trace Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
1 1/2 oz Foggy Ridge Cider Pippin Gold
long squeeze grenadine
Fill with your favorite ginger ale
Garnish with a cherry
 
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Foggy Ridge Cider Makers Tasting Notes for Pippin Gold:
Pippin Gold is a unique blend of 100% Newtown Pippin hard cider and apple brandy from Laird and Company, the country’s oldest distiller. Pippin Gold is delicious as a dessert cider or sweet apéritif. Some have swooned over peaches soaked in Pippin Gold served with homemade pound cake.
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Links:
Brookville Restaurant: www.brookvillerestaurant.com
Foggy Ridge Cider: www.foggyridgecider.com
Laird & Company: www.lairdandcompany.com
Buffalo Trace Distillery: www.buffalotracedistillery.com
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Image: Malus domestica: Yellow Newtown. Charlottesville, Virginia, 1904.
Artist: Deborah Griscom Passmore
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705
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Smith, Jones, Plumb and Penn.

Smith, Jones, Plumb and Penn. Cider Apples of Yesteryear.

The National Agricultural Library’s collection of pomological watercolor illustrations includes images of cider apples of renown such as the Harrison, Virginia or Hewe’s Crab, Ablemarle and Newtown Pippins.

Also documented by the artists working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Division of Pomology are less well-known American cider apples such as the Smith Cider,  Jones Cider, Plumb Cider and the Penn Cider.

Image credit: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705″

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Malus domestica: Smith Cider, Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, 1932

Malus domestica: Smith Cider

Malus domestica: Smith Cider

Malus domestica: Smith Cider

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Smith Cider
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
112350
Year:
1932
Notes on original:
Section J, Row 17, Tree 3
Date created:
1932-01-30
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705″
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Celebrate Repeal Day®: Drink a Cider.

Repeal Day® Is December 5.

The motto:

The Freedom To Celebrate. Celebrate The Freedom.

Read more about Repeal Day®  and suggested activities at www.repealday.org

We Suggest A Fine Way To Celebrate Repeal Day®: Drink a Cider.

Read the fascinating Analysis of the U. S. Liquor Industry during Prohibition originally published in Fortune Magazine: U.S. Liquor Industry (Fortune 1931)

Suggested Accompaniment: A Glass of Cider.

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Plans are afoot for The Wassail.

Plans are afoot for The Wassail.

Watch for more news about
The Great (North) American Wassail 
Jan 5-17, 2014 
Honoring The Orchard & Celebrating The Apple.
Halfdome, Yosemite 1933, Ansel Adams NARA

Cider is one of the good gifts which are to be received with thanksgiving.

WPA October

We therefore believe that cider is one of the good gifts which are to be received with thanksgiving; and we desire to see its manufacture so perfected, that it will rank with wine in public estimation: and if our experience can add to the stock of information on this subject, we cheerfully give it, though we may encounter the reprobation of some ultra abstinence, not to say, temperance men.

From: Tilton’s Journal of Horticulture, Volume 5, J. E. Tilton & Company, 1869.

To read more about Cider and Cider-Manufacture, see Tilton’s Journal of Horticulture, Volume 5.

WPA November

Image credit:  October. Leslie Bryan Burroughs. [1938]. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, WPA Poster Collection, Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-7683.

November. Ben Kaplan. [1938]. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, WPA Poster Collection, Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-7684.

 

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The State of Cider: New York: New Amsterdam Market Cider Revival!

Celebrate the 3rd Annual Cider Revival at New Amsterdam Market, Sunday November 24, 2013 from 11 AM to 5PM.

The Final Event of Cider Week NY: Enjoy cider tastings with New York cidermakers , including: Blackbird CidersBreezy Hill OrchardDocs Hard CiderOrchard Hill Cider Mill and Sovereign Cider.

And a Cider Library collection of wonderful cider & apple books (pictured) will be raffled with all proceeds to benefit New Amsterdam Market.

From the New Amsterdam Market website:

On Sunday November 24, New Amsterdam Market will host the Third Annual New York State Cider Revival in collaboration with Glynwood, a continuation of Cider Week. The event will feature New York hard cider makers, reviving a century’s old tradition of the fermented beverage. Once one of the most popular beverages of New York, hard cider faced a quick demise as Prohibition ended legal sales. As cider orchards transformed into traditional apple orchards, the number of farmstead and craft ciders drastically reduced. Join us in celebrating the return of this historic drink, with numerous tasting and pairing from select vendors. The perfect accompaniment for your Thanksgiving meal.

In addition, our November 24th market will stock all your holiday essentials- from pies to poultry!

Join the Cider Revival

&

Support New Amsterdam Market

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Celebrate the New York Cider Revival and Win Your Own Cider Library!

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It’s The 3rd Annual Cider Revival at the New Amsterdam Market in New York City Sunday, November 24.

Visit The New York State Cider & Thanksgiving Market for a chance to win Your Own Cider Library AND Support The New Amsterdam Market.

Enter to win an amazing Cider Research & Reference Library – several publishers have generously donated some terrific books – perfect for the cider & apple lover or the cider curious. For yourself or for gift giving.

WAIT There’s MORE!

The Cider Research & Reference Library includes a few bottles of real New York cider!

Stop by the main Market table on Sunday Nov. 24th, and enter to win The Cider Library with Libations! Tickets $5 each or $10 for 3. Such value! and for a good cause.

All proceeds to benefit The New Amsterdam Market.

Take a look at the books included in the Cider (and Apple) Research & Reference Library:

Cider Hard & Sweet: History, Traditions, and Making Your Own 3rd Edition by Ben Watson, The Countryman Press, 2013.

Cider Hard & Sweet

Taste, Memory: Forgotten Foods, Lost Flavors, and Why They Matter by David Buchanan, Chelsea Green Publishing, 2012.

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The New Cider Makers Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for Craft Producers by Claude Jolicoeur, Chelsea Green Publishing, 2013.

755

The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart, Algonquin Books, 2013.

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Worlds Best Ciders by Pete Brown & Bill Bradshaw, Sterling Epicure, 2013.

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Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press, 2013.

True Brews: How to Craft Fermented Cider, Beer, Wine, Sake, Soda, Mead, Kefir, and Kombucha at Home by Emma Christensen, 10 Speed Press, 2013.

True Brews Cover

Johnny Appleseed And The American Orchard: A Cultural History by William Kerrigan, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.

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Apple Lovers Cookbook by Amy Traverso, W. W. Norton & Company, 2011.

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Cider Handbook from Scott Labs, 2013.

Scott 2013-14

Stop by the New Amsterdam Market this Sunday, November 24th, to celebrate the New York Cider Revival, enter to win this swell cider library, and get your holiday marketing done.

Link: newamsterdammarket.com

Directions: newamsterdammarket.com/map.html

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Celebrate The 3rd Annual New York Cider Revival at The New Amsterdam Market

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It’s The 3rd Annual New York Cider Revival at the New Amsterdam Market in New York City this Sunday, November 24, 2013 from 11AM – 5PM.

Visit The New York State Cider & Thanksgiving Market for A Chance to Win Your Own Cider Library AND Support The New Amsterdam Market.

Several New York Cidermakers will be in attendance, including: Blackbird CidersBreezy Hill OrchardDocs Hard CiderOrchard Hill Cider Mill and Sovereign Cider. Meet The Cidermakers & enjoy some cider. See the full list of vendors at The New Amsterdam Market website here.

Link: newamsterdammarket.com

Directions: newamsterdammarket.com/map.html

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A Cider And Apple Stand On The Lee Highway, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia 1935

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Photographer: Rothstein, Arthur – United States. Resettlement Administration

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [reproduction number, LC-DIG-fsa-8a07722 (digital file from original neg.) LC-USF33-T01-002196-M3 (b&w film dup. neg., 70mm size) LC-USF3301-002196-M3 (b&w film dup. neg., 4x5 size)]

For more Virginia Cider 2013 Visit: CIDER WEEK VA ciderweekva.com

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What We’re Reading: The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart

Drunken-Botanist-Cover-low-res

What We’re Reading: The Drunken Botanist. The Plants That Create The World’s Great Drinks.

Algonquin Books, 2013.

Author: Amy Stewart

Exploring botany in a bottle, plant by fascinating plant, with cocktail recipes. Organized by process and botanical families, and styled with a nod to antique tomes, chapter headings include:

Part One: We Explore The Twin Alchemical Processes of Fermentation and Distillation from Which Wine, Beer and Spirits Issue Forth.

The entry for Apple, Malus domestica, Rosaceae (Rose Family) – includes a discussion of cider, notes regarding heritage apples, outlines apple spirit styles, and provides cocktail recipes with history notes. Pear, Pyrus communis, perry and pear spirits are examined as well.

Full of fun facts to know and tell, with Grow Your Own and Field Guide sections, and a diverse array of recipes.

This is the kind of reading you can easily enjoy with a glass of cider; educational, informative, and amusing – a very handy imbibers reference guide indeed.

Visit: drunkenbotanist.com

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Cider Mixology: The Whiskey Smash! Millstone Cellars Blossom Cider in A Woodberry Kitchen Cocktail

WK Wiskey Smash!

Cider Mixology: Whiskey Smash!  Millstone Cellars Blossom Cider at Woodberry Kitchen.

Wending our way back to New York from Virginia – with precious cider cargo in tow – we stopped for refreshment at Woodberry Kitchen, located in a refurbished 19th century mill complex outside of downtown Baltimore. 

Woodberry Kitchen bar artisans embrace the charms of cider, allowing us to start the evening properly with a cider cocktail, The Whisky Smash! 

Mixologist C. Connor Rasmussen, kindly shared the recipe.

The WHISKEY SMASH! How To:

A wonderful cocktail wherein we substitute the more traditional bubbly wine for the sparkling cider:
1.75 bourbon (above 90 proof)
.75 lemon (fresh squeezed)
.5 honey syrup (89% honey to water)
Shake everything up and pour over rocks with a dash of bitters and top with the sparkling cider!
Garnish with a fresh rosemary sprig.
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To Start: The Whiskey Smash! and yellow wax peppers on toasts charred in the wood-fired brick oven.
To Follow: An extremely delicious and seriously local meal.
Accompanied By: Regional ciders at every turn.
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Read a bit about Woodberry Kitchen (here).

For another cider cocktail from Woodberry Kitchen, with MIllstone Ciderberry Cider, see The Brewer & Keep Cocktail.

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50 STATES OF CIDER: Ciderland USA: VIRGINIA

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

50 STATES OF CIDER: Ciderland USA: VIRGINIA

Includes Makers of Cider, Perry, Fruit Wines, Meads, and Ice Ciders.

Last updated November 24, 2013.

Have an addition, correction or found a broken link?  Leave a comment or send us an email.

VIRGINIA CIDER MAKERS (8):

Cider Makers of Virginia:

A

Albemarle Ciderworks North Garden, VA

B

Blue Bee Cider  Richmond, VA

Bold Rock Cider Nellysford, VA

C

Castle Hill Cider  Free Union, VA

F

Foggy Ridge Cider Dugspur, VA

O

Old Hill Cider  Timberville, VA

P

Potter’s Craft Cider Free Union, VA

W

Winchester Ciderworks Winchester, VA

EVENTS:

Cider Week Virginia  November 15 – 24, 2013

Link: ciderweekva.com

Please visit the individual cider makers websites to see what events they have scheduled throughout the year.

RESOURCES:

Websites:

Vintage Virginia Apples

Urban Homestead

Virginia Tech Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station Virginia Tech – click this LINK to explore various cider and apple related materials including downloadable pdfs.

Virginia Cooperative Extension 

Books: 

Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press 2013.

Old Southern Apples. A Comprehensive History and Description of Varieties for Collectors, Growers, and Fruit Enthusiasts by Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr., Chelsea Green 2011.

VIRGINIA APPLE & CIDER FACTS:

Virginia apple country includes the mountainous region of the northern Shenandoah Valley through the Roanoke Valley, the rich countryside of Albemarle and Rappahannock counties and the southwest counties of Patrick and Carroll. The majority of apples trees are grown in the Shenandoah Valley. 1

Virginia is the number 6 state in commercial apple production. 2

Famed Virginia apples included the Ablemarle Pippin (also known as the Yellow Newton or Newtown Pippin) and the Virginia or Hewe’s Crab. 3,4

Sources:

1 Virginia Apple Growers www.virginiaapples.org

2 U.S. Apple Association www.usapple.org

3 Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press 2013.

4 Old Southern Apples. A Comprehensive History and Description of Varieties for Collectors, Growers, and Fruit Enthusiasts by Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr., Chelsea Green 2011.

Visit CiderGuide.com to view current US Cider Map and to see if Virginia has any new cider makers.

Please leave a comment if you have VIRGINIA cider resources to add.

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The State of Cider: New York and Virginia. As One Cider Week Concludes, Another Commences.

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Cider Week New York. With this years numerous pre and post events, Cider Week NY has become an extended cider-filled celebration, exuberantly launching New Amsterdam, and environs, into the colder seasons of pome fruit drinking enjoyment.

As New York cider festivities  – though not New York’s cider enthusiasm – wind down, Virginia prepares for Cider Week Virginia.  American wine has a long history in Virginia, as does American cider. Virginia’s cidermakers have done much to restore our favorite fermented apple elixirs place at the table, and Cider Week Virginia celebrates the regions cider heritage and revival.

Our September Cider Road Trip to Virginia was chock full o’ cider. Upcoming posts will feature highlights of our Blue Ridge & Balto. cider adventures, and details of favorite Cider Week NY activities.

Save The Date for the final Cider Week New York event, November 24th, 2013. The New Amsterdam Market, in collaboration with Glynwood, will host The Third Annual New York State Cider Revival at The New York State Cider & Thanksgiving Market. Visit  newamsterdammarket.com for more details.

Links:

Cider Week Virginia ciderweekva.com November 15-24, 2013.

New Amsterdam Market newamsterdammarket.com November 24th, 2013.

Cider Week New York ciderweekny.com

Glynwood glynwood.org

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Resources: Your Daily Cider @HelloCider!

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Your Daily Cider: Tweeting Cider News from around the world, with a focus on Cider in the USA (and North America).

With @HelloCider we attempt to cover all things Cider: Cidermakers Profiles, Emerging Makers, Cider Debuts, Orcharding, Pollinators, Cider (Pome) Fruit Stories, Cider Business & Legislation, Cider Events, Cider History & Lore, Cider-Serving Establishments, Cider Reviews & Tasting Notes, Cider Recipes & Pairing, Cider Mixology, Cider Organizations, Heroes of Cider and Cider Readings & Resources. Everything Useful, Pertinent or Of Interest Re: Cider.

Find us @HelloCider

Tweeting Daily Cider Since December 2013.

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The State of Cider: Virginia. The Ciders of Virginia Prepare to Celebrate Cider Week Virginia.

Orchard at Vintage Virginia Apples

Cider Makers of Virginia:

Albemarle Ciderworks North Garden

Blue Bee Cider  Richmond

Bold Rock Cider Nellysford

Castle Hill Cider  Free Union

Foggy Ridge Cider Dugspur

Old Hill Cider  Timberville

Potter’s Craft Cider Free Union

Winchester Ciderworks Winchester

Cider Week Virginia November 15 -24, 2013

There will be tastings, pairings, home cider making workshops, cider cocktail competitions, an East vs West Cider Smackdown and that’s not all. Check the Cider Week Virginia website for all the details and get ready to Celebrate Cider Week Virginia!

Link: ciderweekva.com

Events: http://ciderweekva.com/events/

Image: Fall Orchard View at Ablemarle CiderWorks & Vintage Virginia Apples

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The State of Cider: Massachusetts Prepares to Celebrate CiderDays.

 

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19th Annual Franklin County CiderDays will be held this weekend, November 2-3, 2013.

CiderDays is one of the premier events of the North American Cider Season.

From the website:

“CiderDays is a community event celebrating all things apples in Franklin County, Massachusetts. 2013 marks the 19th year of this event and there will be two days (November 2nd and 3rd) of orchard tours, cidermaking and tastings, workshops and much more. This is for all who love apples, fresh or hard cider, apple cuisine, apple orchards or just being in New England in the fall.”

Franklin County CiderDays November 2 – 3, 2013

Two days celebrating and enjoying The Apple.

A few of the 2013 Event Highlights that caught our eye:

• Second Annual Cider Days Harvest Party 2013 Friday, Nov 1st – A kickoff event to benefit  CiderDays & includes the début of West County Ciders releases for 2013.

The Cider Salon — “the world’s largest hard cider tasting with more than 60 individual  cider brands from across North America”. 

CiderDay Locavore Harvest Supper 

Spanish Cider Tasting and Discussion with James Asbel of Ciders of Spain

North vs. South Heritage Apple Smackdown, Part Deux, a tasting and discussion with   Tom Burford and John Bunker.

Michael Phillips talks about Apple Varieties for the Organic Orchard

• Finding a Great Cider Apple in Your Backyard with John Bunker and Claude Jolicoeur

Apples for Juice and Cider with Claude Jolicoeur and Alan Suprenant

Organic Orcharding Practices: A Primer with Jennifer Williams and Steve Gougeon

• So You Want to Be a Commercial Cidermaker with Steve Gougeon and Andy Brennan

• Cidermaking 101 Workshop with Bob Delisle and Charlie Olchowski

Visit Franklin County CiderDays website for ALL the details and a complete list of events.

Link: www.ciderdays.org

Note: A bit about CiderDays from the website:

“CiderDay began in 1994 when Terry and Judith Maloney organized a small event to celebrate their harvest. Now called CiderDays and sponsored by the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce, it is a two-day event which celebrates its 19th year in 2013. The event is always held on the first weekend of November, when even the late-bearing cider apples have been picked.”

 

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Gleanings: On Apples, Terroir, and Newark Cider.

Trained&PrunedAppleTreeNewark Cider .

Gleanings: On Apples, Terroir, and Newark Cider.

Concerning Newark’s famous old time cider the following specific information on the ingredients thereof will be new and of interest to many readers. Our informant was the late John Oakes of Bloomfield. He said some time ago:

“Quite a large portion of the land in Bloomfield in the last century, the eighteenth and the first third of this the nineteenth, was in farms. They were small, comparatively few of more than fifty acres. The farmers raised on the land rye, oats, Indian corn, potatoes, and buckwheat; very little wheat and hay. They had large orchards of apples for making cider which under the name of ‘Newark cider’ was known over a large extent of country, shipped to the South, as well as to points in these parts. It was celebrated as the best. It was made the best from two kinds of apples mixed, two-thirds being Harrison apples, which were small and a light yellow color, a little tart and very juicy; and one third being the Canfield apple, large, red and sweet, both seedlings having originated here.”

Thus Newark cider was the product of Newark fruit and Newark invention. -JFF

Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, Volume 3 . New Jersey Historical Society, 1918 – New Jersey.

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

And this from: History of Essex and Hudson Counties, New Jersey, Volume 1. Everts & Peck, 1884 – Essex County (N.J.)
The apple was planted extensively soon after the settlement, on a range of the cleared land.  As early as 1682, Governor Carteret, writing to the proprietors in England said:
“At Newark is made great quantities of cider, exceeding any that we have from New England, Rhode Island or Long Island”.
The high quality of Newark cider has been maintained from then until now.
The red clay soil, the debris of the red sandstone, has been congenial to the growth and fine quality of the apple and pear; in fact there is no part of the State of New Jersey where fruit is superior to that grown in the county of Essex, and where the soil has been properly tilled and fertilized, agricultural products have always met the expectations of the cultivator.
Trained&PrunedAppleTree

And from: The Western Agriculturist, and Practical Farmer’s Guide. Robinson and Fairbank, 1830. Nicholas Longworth Esq. – of the famed Catawaba wines of Ohio, a man considered the father of American grape culture – writes that the Harrison, Campfield, and Graniwinkle

“are the apples from which the celebrated Newark cider is made.”

Longworth experimented growing Harrison and Virginia crab apples in Ohio for cider, but he failed to achieve a wholly successful result, and details his effort thus:

“I obtained from Newark, New Jersey, many years since, some trees of the Harrison apple from which their celebrated cider is made. The cider I made from them was aqueous and seldom retains its sweetness till the proper season for bottling.

The best Newark cider is made on the Newark mountains on a poor stony soil.

On a recent visit to that state I particularly examined this apple in their orchards to endeavour to ascertain the difference. I found the apples knotty, and of a less size than the same fruit in the West, unfit for the table but evidently possessing more of the saccharine principle. The Virginia crab retains all its fine cider qualities with us in great perfection. No soil, no climate. no cultivation can make it edible. To reconcile these apparent contradictions writers have furnished us with no clue and we must endeavour to deduce them from analogy and reason.”

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Proceedings Of The Farmers Club

APPLE GRAFTS

Mr Daniel B. Bruen, Newark, N. J. now brought forward a of cions of the apple, and read in connection therewith a report, of which the following is the substance:

This is the Harrison apple; its origin is in Orange, Essex county, N. J. and named after Simeon Harrison, owner of the farm. It is the most celebrated cider known. It bears large crops, fruit small. Eight bushels produce one barrel of cider; it is very rich in saccharine matter. This, the Campfield apple, has its origin in Newark, named after Matthew Campfield, one of the first settlers of Newark, almost universally used in the proportion of one-third with the Harrison in manufacturing the celebrated Newark cider. The fruit is rich in saccharine matter, and keeps well until spring; good for cooking, very little better for table use than a well-soaked cork from cider bottle.

Annual Report of the American Institute, of the City of New York. American Institute of the City of New York, 1869.

Resources: 
Search books.google.com and archive.org for more interesting cider and pomological information.
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Observations on Cider. No. 265. 1867.

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No. 265.

Observations on Cider.

From the great diversity of soil and climate in the United States of America, and the almost endless variety of its apples, it follows that much diversity of taste and flavour will necessarily be found in the cider that is made from them. To make good cider, the following general, but important, rules should be attended to. They demand a little more trouble than the ordinary mode of collecting and mashing apples of all sorts, rotten and sound, sweet and sour, dirty and clean, from the tree and the soil, and the rest of the slovenly process usually employed ; but in return they produce you a wholesome, high-flavoured, sound, and palatable liquor, that always commands an adequate price, instead of a solution of “villanous compounds,” in a poisonous and acid wash, that no man in his senses will drink. The finest cider was made of an equal portion of ripe, sound pippin and crab apples, pared, cored, and pressed, etc., with the utmost nicety. It was equal in flavour to any champagne that ever was made.

Title: Six hundred receipts, worth their weight in gold : including receipts for cooking, making preserves, perfumery, cordials, ice creams, inks, paints, dyes of all kinds, cider, vinegar, wines, spirits, whiskey, brandy, gin, etc., and how to make imitations of all kinds of liquors : together with valuable gauging tables : the collections, testing, and improvements on the receipts extending over a period of thirty years.

Author: Marquart, John  1867

Publisher: Philadelphia : J.E. Potter

via internetarchive.org

Read online: https://archive.org/details/sixhundredreceipt00marq

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If You Like Cider, Like We Like Cider

LOC apple imageA Quick Reminder (as if you need to be prodded to go out and seek cider):

Cider events abound this time of year – so if you like cider, like we like cider,

partake of the cider activities occurring across the country. And take a friend.

A Sampling:

Cider Week NY & Hudson Valley is well underway and the New Amsterdam region is awash in cider.

Cider Week NY  – New York & Hudson Valley – October 18 – 27, 2013

Link: http://ciderweekny.com/

Great Maine Apple Day an apple-filled day of talks, walks and apple ID sessions with  John Bunker and book signings with Claude Jolicoeur.

Great Maine Apple Day October 27, 2013

Link: http://mofga.org/Default.aspx?tabid=294

Franklin County Cider Days is in its 19th year as a “community event celebrating all things apple.” Offerings include workshops, tastings, cider salons, and more.

Franklin County Cider Days – Franklin County, Massachusetts Nov 2-3, 2013

Link: http://www.ciderdays.org

Cider Week VA – Virginia – November 15 – 23, 2013

Virginia is Cider County. We enjoyed Virginia cider and hospitality on a recent visit, and you can too.

Link: www.ciderweekva.com

Slow Food Russian River Event: Cider & Cheese Pairing with Titled Shed Ciderworks and Devoto Orchards Cider. Oct 27, 3-6 PM for tickets:

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/470210

RESOURCES: To find cider festivities in your area:

Visit the website, pages, and twitter feeds of your favorite local & regional cider makers to find out what events they are involved in.

Check your regional cider association, alliance, or organization’s events list.

Great Lakes Cider & Perry Association 

Hudson Valley Cider Alliance 

Northwest Cider Association

Rocky Mountain Cider Association 

Vermont Ice Cider Association 

And in Canada:

Cidre du Québec / Les Cidriculteurs Artisans du Québec 

Ontario Craft Cider Association

Perhaps it is time for a National Cider Calendar?

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Cider + Cheese and You. A Tasting with Tilted Shed Ciderworks and DeVoto Orchards Cider.

A Slow Food Russian River Cider + Cheese Tasting Scholarship Fund Benefit Event

When our resident Cheesemonger crafted a fantasy-cheese pairing featuring Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 GRAVIVA! Semidry Cider, our cider pen pals at Tilted Shed responded by hosting the First-Ever Sebastopol Cider and Cheese Challenge and invited Apple Sauced Cider to join in. You can read about their cider+cheese pairing adventures here.

Actual Cider + Cheese Pairings are definitely more fun.

Want to enjoy a guided cheese + cider pairing featuring Tilted Shed Ciderworks & Devoto Orchards Cider? You Can!

Sign up for the upcoming SLOW FOOD RUSSIAN RIVER Benefit Event.

Link: EVENT: CIDER & CHEESE PAIRING OCT. 27, 3-6PM, SEBASTOPOL

“Devoto Orchards and Tilted Shed Ciderworks, two Sebastopol-area farm-based cider producers, will join six local cheesemakers in showcasing craft cider’s amazing range and versatility.”

Yes. The cider artisans and orchardists behind Apple Sauced Cider and Devoto Gardens are launching a new brand,: Devoto Orchards Cider. This first seasons releases of farmstead ciders will include: Gravenstein, 1976, and Cidre Noir.

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